Productive Search Engine Optimization – A Step Forward to Successful Search Engine Optimization

If you have a web site, what could be your concentration so that your web site will become popular in the Internet? Search engine optimization should be your main focus. It could help you get the traffic that you wanted so that you would be able to make big bucks on your web site. If you are "searchable" then you are in for this business. All you have to do is maintain that one and you would just see how your web site becomes successful.

Here are some tips so that you could be a step forward to successful search engine optimization.

1. You can submit your web site to search engines manually. But then there are some considerations that you need. Your web site's pages should be completely finished since search engines will not pay any attention for unfinished web sites. You should not also be a spammer meaning you should not be using keywords on your web site just for the sake of having them. Use keywords appropriately.

2. Web spiders are also looking for keywords so they can rank your web site. You need to target the keywords you want and make sure that you have them on your content. They should be used appropriately since over usage of keywords would drive away web spiders.

3. Make sure that you have other links to and from your site. The more links to your site, the better. You would be able to get a lot of targeted traffic if your web site is accessible to these visitors. You can exchange links with other sites but preferably exchange links with sites that have already established traffic.

4. You can also add in a forum on your site. If you have an area where where visitors can actually interact, time will come that more and more people would want to be involved in the discussion. Of course, this traffic is what you need to be on the top page rank.

Nokia E65 – A Stylish Way To Work

Nokia's E series mobile phones have always been dubbed as enterprise solutions aimed at business users and professionals. Therefore, more than its designing aspects or its positioning, the company has embarked on the handset's functionality. As report has it, Microsoft Office documents editing software kit embedded in Eseries features notably better than Microsoft's very own applications for Windows Mobile. The Nokia E65 – a member of this family of business phone brings in the much needed style quotient to the other serious looking E series mobile phones.

The Nokia E65 is a slider that belongs to the 'slim is in' category, being one of Nokia's smallest sliders. This S60 platform based, Symbian OS v9.1 operated smartphone is available in flsy red and a more sober mocca solution. A large, TFT based QVGA display dominate the front fascia of this slider. The screen is capable of producing an astounding 16 million different hues across 240×320 pixels. Silver shaded keypads enhances the appeal further. A set of spaced out numeric keys and a 5D navigational button makes it very easy to use the Nokia E65 .

The handset's face lift has no way affected the level of functionality that an E series mobile phone is expected to exhibit. The Nokia E65 is loaded with all possible tools and technologies to aid businessmen and professionals, optimize their capabilities. From the most 'basic' feature like integrated hands free to high end connectivity options like WiFi and VoIP over WLAN find their place in the feature list. The Nokia E65 boasts of a full fledged Office Application and an already enhanced PIM that includes calender, to do list and printing. Its Push to Talk feature allows its user to use the mobile phone just like a walkie talkie over a cellular network.

The handset's almost unending feature list includes 3G, GPRS, EDGE, Bluetooth, Infrared, USB, a 2.0 megapixel camera and a Symbian media player.

Shopping for Gifts on a Budget

Holiday shopping is seldom easy. Whether you're just hopping around department stores or just surfing the net, the limitless choices made available by advertisers can actually be more of a detriment for someone who is in a real hurry. This can be quite problematic if you're on a budget and have such a long shopping list. Time constraints do not really provide you the benefit of thoroughly comparing every item in each store in an effort to find yourself the best bargain. One who has been shopping for hours can quite easily succumb to the pressure and end up buying gifts beyond a planned budget.

If you're in this very familiar predicament, all is not lost. When shopping for holiday gifts it sometimes makes more sense to look for items that are simple yet meaningful. While a sophisticated electronic gadget could certainly get a friend excited, simple inexpensive gifts like personalized mugs or engraved pens may just elicit the same amount of appreciation.

Nothing is perhaps more appropriate than a gift that actually captures the holiday spirit. As holidays bring sentimental moments, you'd want to give something you would be remembered for. Embroidered pillows and blankets would be good choices. Collectibles like cd's and personalized caps should also do the trick. Listed below are some gift items worth considering:

• shirt of a home team

• cross stitching kit

• bottle of a local wine

• personalized notepad

• stationary

• photo album

• memo holders

• tool kits

• Carpentry kits

• versatile pocket knife

While you'll certainly be shaved with praises by giving a fancy cellphone or notebook, it sometimes makes more sense to go for something more practical yet thoughtful. You do not really have to dent your budget to please a friend. People tend to get appreciated more for the amount of effort that they've performed in looking for that meaningful gift that touches the heart. Whether it's Christmas, Thanksgiving, or a major school reunion, there's really no reason to panic. All it takes is just a little imagination and a touch of creativity.

For more information on unique gifts and specialty items, please visit

[http://www.levelpromogifts.com].

Thunder Megaphone – A Glacial Valley Can Focus and Amplify Thunder Into a Most Extraordinary Sound

We’ve all heard thunder, and we all know what causes it. Many of us have heard two distinct kinds of thunder, but perhaps we never really noticed or thought about it. Recently, I heard a third kind of thunder.

“Ordinary” thunder – a thoroughly extraordinary sound, but the kind of thunder we hear most often – happens when lightning occurs at some distance from the observer. The initial sound of the lightning bolt echoes off surrounding objects and air masses. Because it is echoed so many times, the thunder stretches out into many, many seconds, even though the initial sound might have lasted a second or two at most. Moreover, because the initial sound echoes off soft things with indistinct surfaces – clouds, thermoclines, and weather fronts – and because many echoes reach the ears of the observer at different times, the original sound is greatly distorted. Almost all high frequency components are filtered out, and the observer hears mostly a low-pitched rumble.

When lightning strikes very close to the observer, within a few hundred feet, the sound is entirely different. The observer might not hear echoes of the thunder at all, but only the pure initial sound. It is a single, sharp, intense “POW!” It may be followed by a much quieter, but still loud, whistling or hissing sound.

But what about that third kind of lightning?

I was camping alone in Crawford Notch State Park in northern New Hampshire, when thunderstorms began rolling into the valley just after dinner. I tidied up my campsite just before the rain started, then retreated to my tent. One thunderstorm passed without much incident.

Darkness had fallen by the time the second thunderstorm rolled up from the south. I occupied myself by counting the time interval between lightning and thunder to track the movements of the storms. Fifteen seconds before the thunder rolled up from somewhere west of Mount Bemis, and I knew the storm was just under three miles southwest of me. Seven seconds between the flash and the rumble beyond Frankenstein Cliff, and I knew the storm was passing nearly a mile and a half to my west.

And then it happened!

A flash. I counted eleven seconds. And I heard a sound unlike any thunder I had ever heard before.

The cacophony included at least half a dozen rapid repetitions of the “POW!” of a nearby lightning strike. But at the same time, there was the rumbling and roaring of “ordinary” thunder, but much, much louder than usual.

Before I could figure out what that sound was, there was another flash somewhere to the north. Again I counted eleven seconds, and again I heard that utterly incredible crackling and powing and rumbling and roaring.

This time, I figured it out.

It was a lightning strike right within the upper reaches of Crawford Notch just a couple of miles north of me. It was right within a gigantic stone megaphone formed by Webster Cliff on the east, Mount Field and Mount Willey on the west, and the old glacial cirque of Mount Willard for a backstop on the north.

And this 1,500 foot deep, three-mile-long granite megaphone was pointed right at Dry River Campground.

Yes, the beautiful U-shaped glacial valley of Crawford Notch is a nearly perfect megaphone, albeit open on top. The bare stone faces of Mount Willard and Webster Cliff echoed the initial “POW!” of the thunder almost undistorted. The western slope of the notch is a bit more heavily wooded, but there’s enough bare ledge and rockslide there to provide a pretty good echo. The open top of the notch was covered by the underbelly of the thunderstorm itself, which provided enough of a soft echoic surface to create the usual rumbling of thunder in addition to the clean “POW!” echoes off the rock faces.

But all of this sound was extraordinarily loud because of the megaphone that focused it all right on me and my campsite.

After I got this all figured out, there was a third lightning flash in the north. Yes, eleven second later, there was that glorious, unearthly sound again.

I wondered why I had never heard this kind of thunder before. I have probably experienced thunderstorms in Crawford Notch at least a dozen times over the years, but never heard the Thunder Megaphone.

My best guess is that I probably have heard it before, but never noticed it. Most of the times I’ve camped there, it was with a crowd of friends and family. Much goes on when a thunderstorm rolls in. Ponchos have to be broken out and put on, while at the same time, various disorderly what-nots need to get stashed into cars and tents before they get soaked. There is a bit of yelling and shouting to be done, and paradoxically among the mayhem, kids and dogs need to have their fears calmed. Meanwhile, tarps over the tents and picnic tables are flapping in the gales, making a poor imitation of thunder themselves.

In all my 25 years camping in Crawford Notch, this may have been the first time I experienced a thunderstorm while I was camping there alone. There was no tarp over the tent, and I had anticipated the thunderstorm well enough to get everything into the car long before the rain started.

So, when the lightning and thunder came, I had nothing to do but observe.

What a treat!

I half hope we get a thunderstorm the next time we go camping in the mouth of the Thunder Megaphone.